Sunday, April 29, 2012

Request your free Stability Ball HERE Once you get to the site, click “SIGN UP” at the top, fill out the form, and include the promo code below
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Tuesday, April 24, 2012

help a friend of mine plz :)

Help my friend Kim Davis win a carseat! She is suuuper super close only one lady ahead of her and no one even close to being on her heels she said it ends Tuesday, but u just find her comment and like it =)

Saturday, April 7, 2012

my store

coconut oil for dogs

so here is another use for coconut oil I dont remember where I found this info but I wanted to share it :)

Dosing dogs
No one has tested coconut oil’s effect on dogs in clinical trials, but the anecdotal evidence is impressive. Reports published on Internet forums describe how overweight dogs become lean and energetic soon after they begin eating coconut oil, or their shabby-looking coats become sleek and glossy, and dogs with arthritis or ligament problems grow stronger and more lively. Even some serious diseases have responded. In one case, a Doberman Pinscher with severe Wobblers made a dramatic recovery in less than a week while taking coconut oil.

Other reports involve itchy skin, cuts, wounds, and ear problems. Dogs with flea allergies, contact dermatitis, or other allergic reactions typically stop scratching soon after coconut oil is added to their food, and dogs treated topically for bites, stings, ear mites, ear infections, cuts, or wounds recover quickly. One dog was stung by a bee, causing her mouth to swell. An hour after her owner applied coconut oil to the sting and gave her a tablespoon to swallow, the swelling disappeared and the dog was herself again.

How to administer
For convenient application, store coconut oil in both a glass eyedropper bottle and a small jar. During cold weather, these containers are easy to warm in hot water so that the oil quickly melts.

Use the eyedropper to apply coconut oil to ears, cuts, wounds, mouth sores, and other targeted areas, including your dog’s toothbrush.

Use the small jar to apply coconut oil to larger areas, such as cracked paw pads. Coconut oil is not fast-drying, so use a towel or tissue to remove excess oil as needed. The main challenge with coconut oil’s topical application is that dogs love the taste and immediately lick it off. To give coconut oil a chance to disinfect wounds and speed healing, cover the wound with a towel for a few minutes, or distract the dog long enough for at least some of the oil to be absorbed.

Coconut oil is also an excellent massage oil and carrier oil for use with medicinal herbs and aromatherapy. Any of the essential oils mentioned in “Essential Information” (January 2005) can be diluted in coconut oil for safe, effective canine application, and coconut oil is a perfect base for the herbal salves and oils described in “Savvy Salves” (August 2005).

In addition to lubricating the skin and joints, coconut oil acts as a natural preservative, is exceptionally stable, has a long shelf life, does not require refrigeration, and is such a powerful disinfectant that it reduces the need for germ-killing essential oils in aromatherapy blends designed to fight infection.

Important to start slooooow
Solid or liquid coconut oil can be added to food at any meal or given between meals. The optimum dose for dogs is about 1 teaspoon per 10 pounds of body weight daily, or 1 tablespoon per 30 pounds. These are general guidelines, as some dogs need less and others more.

But don’t start with these amounts. Instead, introduce coconut oil a little at a time in divided doses. Because coconut oil kills harmful bacteria, viruses, parasites, yeasts, and fungi, the burden of removing dead organisms can trigger symptoms of detoxification. Headaches, fatigue, diarrhea, and flu-like symptoms are common in humans who consume too much too fast, and similar symptoms can occur in dogs.

Even in healthy dogs, large amounts of coconut oil can cause diarrhea or greasy stools while the body adjusts. Start with small amounts, such as ¼ teaspoon per day for small dogs or puppies and 1 teaspoon for large dogs. Gradually increase the amount every few days. If your dog seems tired or uncomfortable or has diarrhea, reduce the amount temporarily.

Coconut oil isn’t the only coconut product that’s good for dogs. Fresh or dried coconut is an excellent source of dietary fiber, and dogs enjoy and benefit from the same coconut flakes, coconut flour, coconut cream, coconut milk, shredded coconut, and coconut spreads used by their human companions. Just be sure the products are unsweetened and free from chemical preservatives.